Abstract # 200:

Scheduled for Monday, August 28, 2017 12:45 PM-01:00 PM: (National Ballroom Salon B) Oral Presentation


THE EFFECT OF INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES ON CALLING RATES ACROSS THE VOCAL REPERTOIRE OF THE MALE RING-TAILED LEMUR (LEMUR CATTA)

L. M. Bolt1,2
1Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, Terrence Donnelly Health Sciences Complex, HSC300, 3359 Mississauga Road, Mississauga, ON L5L1C6, Canada, 2University of Toronto
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     Understanding how vocal repertoires are used by individuals leads to a better understanding of the cognitive capacities of social species. In strepsirrhine primates, it is largely unknown how inter-individual differences relate to vocalization usage. To investigate, I studied the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), a gregarious strepsirrhine with a large vocal repertoire. My study explored the relationship between individual age, dominance rank, and vocalization rate for all calls across the vocal repertoire of the male ring-tailed lemur. In 2010, 565 hours of focal data were collected from 31 males aged 1 and older from Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar. High-ranking males had higher vocalization rates for calls used in aggressive agonistic interactions (Multiple regression tests: purr, b=0.006, SE=0.001, t2,28 =3.895, p=0.001; squeal, b=0.007, SE=0.002, t2,28=4.168, p<0.001). Low-ranking males had higher vocalization rates for some affiliative and some submissive agonistic calls (hmm, b=-0.0217, SE=0.00816, t2,28=-2.66, p=0.0128; yip, b=-0.011, SE=0.004, t2,28=-2.484, p=0.019). Young males had higher vocalization rates for an affiliative call (chirp, b=-0.044, SE=0.022, t2,28=-2.027, p=0.05). My results indicated that when call usage across behavioural contexts was considered, there were patterns in ring-tailed lemur vocalization rates that varied with age and dominance rank. With the ring-tailed lemur as one of the best living models of social primate ancestors, understanding how vocal repertoires are used on an individual level informs our understanding of the evolution of primate sociality.