Abstract # 203:

Scheduled for Monday, August 28, 2017 01:30 PM-01:45 PM: (National Ballroom Salon B) Oral Presentation


CENTRALITY AND SOCIAL POWER: INDIVIDUAL ROLES IN A SOCIAL NETWORK OF A CAPTIVE GROUP OF HAMADRYAS BABOONS (PAPIO HAMADRYAS)

L. M. Radosevich1, K. E. Jaffe2, D. E. Minier3, W. Clack1 and K. Gretler1
1Department of Biology, Sonoma State University, 1801 E. Cotati Blvd. , Rohnert Park, California 94928, USA, 2Department of Anthropology, Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park, CA, 3Animal Care, Conservation, and Research, Oakland Zoo
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     Studying intragroup interactions of group-living species in captivity provides insights into group cohesion that may aid in providing optimal care. Social network analysis (SNA), which utilizes quantitative measures of group systems to represent how social interactions influence group structure, may aid in this endeavor. To understand the effect of an introduction on group cohesion, we examined the network of a group of hamadryas baboons (Papio hamadryas) at Oakland Zoo after the introduction of two juvenile males. We hypothesized that centrality of the males would increase as they were integrated into the group. We collected data using all-occurrences event-sampling of all social interactions (N=14 individuals) from July-December 2016 (113 hrs.). Three measures of centrality were utilized: betweenness, closeness, and eigenvector centrality. Neither of the new males showed a significant change in closeness over time. Both males showed a decrease in eigenvector centrality (p=0.0093, p<0.0001) and one of the males showed an increase in betweenness (p=0.035), while the other did not. The decreases in eigenvector centrality indicate that the new males decreased their interactions with central individuals. However, the increase in betweenness by one male indicates that he has a growing intermediary role in the network and therefore increasing social power. These males are still young and measures may continue to change as the males mature and develop harems of their own.