Abstract # 170:

Scheduled for Sunday, August 27, 2017 10:30 AM-10:45 AM: (Grand Ballroom) Oral Presentation


EXPLORING THE SHARED GENETIC CONTRIBUTIONS TO PERSONALITY AND BRAIN STRUCTURAL COVARIATION IN CHIMPANZEES (PAN TROGLODYTES)

R. D. Latzman1 and W. D. Hopkins1,2
1Georgia State University, Department of Psychology, Atlanta, GA 30302-5010, USA, 2Yerkes National Primate Research Center
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     A converging literature suggests that both human and nonhuman primates possess a largely consistent set of heritable neurobiologically-based Personality traits. To date, however, direct investigations of the joint heritability of Personality traits and associated Neuroanatomy are scarce. The current research thus aimed to examine the extent to which associations between Personality traits and Neuroanatomy was a result of shared genetic effects among 188 socially-housed, captive chimpanzees. Specifically, using source-based morphometry (SBM), a multivariate analysis of naturally occurring patterns of covariation of grey matter across the brain, we 1) investigated associations between independent structural components and Personality, 2) estimated the genetic contributions to variation in each, and 3) investigated the extent to which phenotypic associations were a result of a set of common genes (i.e.,genetic correlations [?G]). Associations between Openness and Extraversion and a component that included fronto-parietal regions and between Extraversion and a component that included limbic regions emerged. Both Personality traits and associated SBM components were found to be heritable and, further, covariation between Personality traits and SBM components were found to result from shared genetic influences (Mdn ?G = .61). The current research provides an example of the power of chimpanzees in the search for the neurobiological basis of Personality with direct translational relevance to humans.