Abstract # 7973 Event # 204:

Scheduled for Monday, August 28, 2017 01:45 PM-02:00 PM: (National Ballroom Salon B) Oral Presentation


EVALUATING THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN RELATIONSHIP SATISFACTION AND PHYSIOLOGICAL LINKAGE IN HUMAN COUPLES (HOMO SAPIENS) AND PAIRS OF SOCIALLY MONOGAMOUS TITI MONKEYS (CALLICEBUS CUPREUS).

E. S. Rothwell1, R. W. Levenson2 and K. L. Bales1
1University of California Davis, One Shields Ave, Davis, California 95616, USA, 2University of California Berkeley
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     Psychological theories suggest that coordination develops between adult attachment partners in behavior, emotion and physiology. Autonomic nervous system (ANS) linkage is hypothesized to convey positive relationship outcomes such as satisfaction and longevity. Literature from human couples finds mixed support, in part due to experimental control limitations. We examined the association between physiological linkage and relationship satisfaction in humans and socially monogamous titi monkeys. Data from married couples (N=120) was collected in California in 1989 and data from titi pairs (N=6) was collected at the California National Primate Research Center. Relationship satisfaction for humans was measured via self-report and for titis was assessed with a partner preference test. ANS physiology was measured in both studies via simultaneous electrocardiography recording from both partners (humans- 45 min.; titis-15 min.). We correlated across partners’ inter-beat interval (IBI) series using a 25-sec.moving window and counting the frequency of linkage moments (i.e. windows) with moderate (-0.3 < r > 0.3) cross-partner IBI correlations. A dyadic mixed model revealed that highly satisfied couples also had a high frequency of linkage moments (p<0.05). Preliminary results are similar in titi pairs with stronger partner preference associating with more frequent linkage moments (p<0.05). These results support the hypothesis that ANS linkage within adult attachment bonds relates to positive relationship outcomes and may not be exclusive to human relationships. Funding: NSFGRFP, NIMHT32, OD011107, Good Nature Institute.