Abstract # 207:

Scheduled for Monday, August 28, 2017 02:30 PM-02:45 PM: (National Ballroom Salon B) Oral Presentation


HOW DO A MALE’S PHYSIOLOGICAL AND SOCIAL PROFILES PREDICT RANK DURATION AND MATING SUCCESS?

R. Habig1, D. A. Jansen1, L. Gesquiere2, J. Altmann3, S. C. Alberts2 and E. A. Archie1
1University of Notre Dame Department of Biological Sciences, 100 Galvin Life Science Center, South Bend, Indiana 46556, USA, 2Duke University, 3Princeton University
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     Dominance rank has profound consequences for male reproductive success in many species. The length of time a male remains at high rank is an important predictor of male fitness. However, we currently have only a limited understanding of why some males stay at high rank longer than others. To investigate predictors of high rank tenure and mating success, we used longitudinal data from adult male baboons (Papio cynocephalus) in the well-studied Amboseli baboon population in Kenya. We tested two hypotheses: one that predicts that the burdens of high rank lead to shorter rank tenures, and another that predicts that only the highest quality males can withstand the burdens of high rank, and subsequently maintain the longest rank tenures. Our results revealed that for high-ranking males, social connectedness was a significant predictor of high rank duration [survival time-varying analysis; alpha <0.001] and mating success [linear mixed model: alpha <0.001] and that these patterns were mediated by demographic and ecological factors including group size, sex ratio, and rainfall. We discuss these results in the context of inter-individual variation in male fitness and the evolution of male reproductive strategies.