Abstract # 153:

Scheduled for Sunday, August 27, 2017 09:15 AM-09:30 AM: (National Ballroom Salon A) Oral Presentation


TIMING OF EARLY MORNING BEHAVIORS OF NEW WORLD PRIMATES AT THE TIPUTINI BIODIVERSITY STATION IN AMAZONIAN ECUADOR (ALOUATTA, ATELES, CALLICEBUS, LAGOTHRIX, PITHECIA)

D. M. Snodderly1,2, K. M. Ellis1,2, S. R. Lieberman1,2, A. Link2,3, E. Fernandez-Duque4, S. Alvarez-Solas 5, L. Abondano1,2 and A. F. Di Fiore1,2
1University of Texas at Austin, Department of Neuroscience, 100 E 24th St, Room 2.504, Austin, TX 78712, USA, 2Fundación Proyecto Primates, 3Universidad de Los Andes, 4Yale University, 5Universidad Regional Amazónica IKIAM, Ecuador
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     Diurnal arboreal primates begin their day with a sequence that typically includes defecation/urination, vocalizations, movement from the sleeping tree, and feeding. We compared timing of first occurrences of morning behaviors for five sympatric species. With rare exceptions, morning activities began only after the onset of nautical twilight (~48 min before sunrise). Vocalizations were tabulated up to 2.5 hours after sunrise. Alouatta and Callicebus made frequent loud calls; 75% of Alouatta’s loud calls, and 45% of Callicebus’ loud calls occurred between nautical twilight and sunrise. Callicebus waited much later to feed; median time for the first feeding bout was 1.5 hours after sunrise. Other taxa made mostly lower-volume contact calls--half to three-quarters after sunrise--typically associated with movement from the sleeping tree. All feeding bouts of Callicebus and Pithecia, 90% of Lagothrix’s, and 80% of Ateles’ occurred after sunrise. Comparisons among species were analyzed using lm models. Median feeding times of Ateles were 35 min earlier than others (p<0.05 vs Callicebus and Lagothrix; p< 0.001 vs Pithecia); Lagothrix and Callicebus were similar; and Pithecia’s median was 21 min later than the rest (p< 0.05 vs Callicebus, p< 0.01 vs Lagothrix). These behavioral differences occur during a period of large changes in ambient illumination, and differences in luminosity could have important influences on the diverse visual phenotypes of these New World primates. Support: NSF IOS-0843354, BCS-1062540, BCS-1540403