Abstract # 8016 Poster # 38:

Scheduled for Saturday, August 26, 2017 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (National Ballroom AB) Poster Presentation


URINARY INDICES OF HEALTH IN ADULT MALE BLACK HOWLERS (ALOUATTA PIGRA) IN BALANCÁN, MÉXICO

E. L. Zucker1, J. C. Serio-Silva2,3 and D. Tejero-Geronimo3
1Loyola University, Department of Psychological Sciences, New Orleans, LA 70118, USA, 2Instituto de Ecologia, A.C., 3Estación de Investigación Primatológica y Vida Silvestre
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Based on urine samples, females with infants at Ranchería Josefa Ortiz de Dominguez had better health than females without infants. As health of males might also be relevant, male health was evaluated based on group structure (one-male vs. multi-male), habitat (playón vs. rainforest), and group immature-to-female ratios (< 1.0 vs. > 1.0). Urine samples obtained February-April 2012 were tested with commercially-available reagent strips for 10 parameters. Overall, differences in health-related indices were few (two-tailed z-tests for differences between proportions). Rainforest males in one-male groups (17 samples) had significantly more samples with above-trace amounts of bilirubin and leukocytes (both p < .003) than males in multi-male groups (44 samples), suggestive of liver or kidney problems, and these differences held when habitats were combined (9 one-male groups, 21 samples; 14 multi-male groups, 89 samples); there were too few samples from one-male playón groups to assess differences within that habitat. Rainforest males, in general, had significantly more samples (of 61) containing ketone than playón males (36 samples; p < .008), suggestive of nutritional stress, perhaps related to higher social density and competition. There were no differences in health indices between males from reproductively successful groups (high ratios) compared to low ratio groups (14 and 6 groups, respectively). While males in one-male groups might have greater risk for some health problems, overall male health did not vary dramatically.