Abstract # 8039 Event # 106:

Scheduled for Saturday, August 26, 2017 03:30 PM-03:45 PM: (National Ballroom Salon B) Oral Presentation


THE PERCEPTION OF MACAQUES’ MINDS IS RELATED TO ATTITUDES ABOUT MACAQUES AT INTERFACES

E. Bliss-Moreau1,2, S. Srivastava3, S. S. Kaburu3, P. R. Marty3, K. Balasubramaniam3, B. Beisner1,3 and B. McCowan1,3
1California National Primate Research Center, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA, 2Department of Psychology, University of California, Davis, 3Department of Population Health & Reproduction, University of California, Davis
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     As human populations increase in size, interactions between humans and nonhuman primates in shared interfaces also become more frequent leading to the potential for conflict. Little attention has been paid to human psychological processes that may influence conflict dynamics. We evaluated human attitudes about rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) and perceptions of macaques’ capacity for experience and agency (ascribing “mind” to them) at interfaces in Northern India after people had an interactions with a macaque or not (N=210). Overall, participants who more strongly endorsed the acceptability of visiting interfaces to see and feed monkeys reported that chasing and hitting monkeys was less acceptable [r(210)=-0.199, p=0.004]. Those who attributed more mind to monkeys also reported that visiting and feeding them at interfaces was more acceptable [r(210)=0.20, p=0.003]. Mind perception, however, did not influence reported acceptability of chasing or hitting monkeys at interfaces [r(210)=0.04, p=0.57]. The extent to which participants liked monkeys also predicted endorsing greater acceptability of visiting and feeding [r(207)=0.43, p<0.0001] and less acceptability of chasing or hitting [r(207)=-0.14, p=0.046], as well as greater ascription of mind to them [r(207)=0.29, p<0.0001]. Implications for using strategies to effect human attitudes and perceptual change as tools to manage human-macaque conflict will be discussed.