Abstract # 8044 Poster # 55:

Scheduled for Saturday, August 26, 2017 06:00 PM-08:00 PM: (Grand Ballroom) Poster Presentation


LOW INHERENT SENSITIVITY TO THE INTOXICATING EFFECTS OF ETHANOL IN LABORATORY-HOUSED RHESUS MONKEYS (MACACA MULATTA) WITH LOW CSF CONCENTRATIONS OF THE SEROTONIN METABOLITE 5-HYDROXYINDOLEACETIC ACID

E. K. Wood1, R. Kruger1, A. Bennion1, B. M. Cooke2, S. Lindell3, M. Schwandt3, D. Goldman4, C. S. Barr3, S. J. Suomi5 and J. D. Higley1
1Brigham Young University, 1042 SWKT, Department of Psychology, Provo, UT 84602, USA, 2Georgia State University, Atlanta GA, 30303, 3Laboratory of Clinical Studies, DICBR, NIAAA, Bethesda, MD, 20892 , 4National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Laboratory of Neurogenetics, 5625 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD, 20852, 5Laboratory of Comparative Ethology, NICHD, NIH Animal Center, Poolesville, MD, 20837
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A reduced response to the intoxicating effects of alcohol, and low central nervous system (CNS) serotonin are known predictors for alcohol use disorders. These studies, performed on young adults with a previous drinking history, left open the possibility that individuals who drink more often develop tolerance rather than possess initial sensitivity to alcohol, leading to high intake. We utilized a nonhuman primate model to investigate the relationship between sensitivity to alcohol and CNS serotonin activity. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were obtained from 82 alcohol-naïve rhesus monkeys, and were assayed for concentrations of the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). One month later, subjects were administered an IV alcohol bolus, placed into a suspended Plexiglass chamber, and time to escape was recorded. Subjects were observed for the next 35 minutes and rated for level of intoxication. Escape latency was positively correlated with intoxication ratings (r=.69, p<.0001). Linear regressions revealed that low baseline CSF 5-HIAA concentrations predicted low intoxication ratings (B=0.24, t(72)=2.04, p=.045), and low CSF 5-HIAA concentrations predicted rapid escape latency (B=0.61, t(18)=3.17, p=.006). Results show that objective measures of intoxication positively correlate with subjective ratings of intoxication, and that both objective and subjective ratings positively correlate with CSF 5-HIAA concentrations, an indication that low CNS serotonin functioning is predictive of low intrinsic sensitivity to the intoxicating effects of ethanol.