Abstract # 917 Poster # 184:

Scheduled for Friday, August 19, 2005 07:00 PM-09:00 PM: (Cambridge/Oxford Room) Poster Presentation


REARING CONDITION DIFFERENCES IN BEHAVIOR WHEN EXPOSED TO AN UNFAMILIAR INTRUDER IN RHESUS MACAQUES (macaca mulatta)

K. L. Chisholm1, M. L. Schwandt1, M. L. Becker2, S. J. Suomi2 and J. D. Higley1
1NIH/NIAAA, Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Studies - Primate Unit, NIH Animal Center, P.O. Box 529, Poolesville, Maryland 20837, USA, 2NIH/NICHD, Laboratory of Comparative Ethology
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     Monkeys deprived of adult parental influence and with limited early social interaction with peers often display inadequate development of aggressive, affiliate, play, and sexual behaviors. We wanted to test the hypothesis that these monkeys would show more risky social behavior, as measured by time spent in arms length of an intruder, during the Intruder Challenge paradigm, in which an unfamiliar, same-sexed and nearly age-matched monkey was placed in a small cage adjacent to the home cage. Forty-four group-living monkeys ranging in age from 4 to 9 years were subjects. As infants, they were reared in one of three conditions: mother-reared (MR) were reared in normal social groups with peers and adult males and females, peer-reared (PR) were reared with same-aged peers but no adults, and surrogate peer-reared (SPR) were raised in single cages with social interactions on a daily but limited basis. Subjects were exposed to the Intruder Challenge test, during which their behavior was recorded for 30 minutes. The results showed that the SPR animals spent significantly more time within arms length of the intruder compared to both MR and PR animals (ANOVA, F = 8.945, P = 0.0006). The current study demonstrated that SPR animals may have exhibited social aberrations when compared to the MR or PR animals because they were deprived of social stimulation as infants.