Abstract # 41:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 18, 2005 03:15 PM-03:30 PM: Session 6 (Crystal Ballroom) Oral Presentation


VALIDATION OF OXYTOCIN AND VASOPRESSIN PLASMA ASSAYS FOR PRIMATES: WHAT CAN BLOOD TELL US?

K. L. Bales1,2, K. M. Kramer3, C. M. Hostetler1,2, J. P. Capitanio1,2 and S. P. Mendoza1,2
1UC-Davis, Dept. of Psychology, Univ. of California, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA 95616, USA, 2California National Primate Research Center, 3Dept of Psychiatry and Brain-Body Center, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago IL 60612
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     The peptide hormones oxytocin (OT) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) are important in a number of physiological (milk let-down, fluid regulation) and behavioral (parental care, social behavior, aggression) functions. Plasma OT and AVP have been less studied than cerebrospinal peptides in non-human primates, due to both methodological and theoretical issues. However, with an increasing number of studies finding links between these peptides and mammalian social behavior, this has become an exciting field of study. We present a validation of enzyme immunoassays for OT and AVP for dusky titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus) and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Plasma samples were collected for 31 titi monkeys and 9 macaques. Parallelism was demonstrated by regression of percent binding against the natural log of the expected concentrations. Quantitative recovery of OT for titis was 105.55 ± 3.24% and for macaques, 102.12 ± 3.37%. Quantitative recovery of AVP for titis was 105.31 ± 13.62% and for macaques, 123.17 ± 1.4%. Male titis had higher plasma AVP than females (P = 0.026, one-tailed), but OT levels did not differ by sex. A group of titi males (n = 5) which displayed higher levels of affiliative behavior also displayed higher plasma OT (but not AVP) than other pair-bonded males in the colony (n = 7; P = 0.04, two-tailed). We also discuss possible species differences and other studies relating these peptides to behavior.