Abstract # 13383 Event # 188:

Scheduled for Saturday, August 24, 2019 10:00 AM-12:00 PM: (Room 225) Symposium


BURNING BRAINS, OR BANKING THEM? SCIENTIFIC AND ETHICAL CONSIDERATION OF STUDIES WITH NONHUMAN PRIMATE POST-MORTEM TISSUE

A. J. Bennett1, W. D. Hopkins2, S. Panicker3, H. Simmons4 and P. J. Pierre4
1University of Wisconsin-Madison, Psychology Department, Madison, WI 53715, USA, 2University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 3American Psychological Association, 4Wisconsin National Primate Research Center
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     Nonhuman primates live in a wide range of settings around the world, including a diverse set of captive environments. Among the objectives for maintaining nonhuman primates in captivity are companionship, education, service, conservation and species preservation, scientific research, and rescue. Whether, when, and how each of these objectives can be ethically justified varies and is often the subject of consideration and decisions at many different levels. There are, however, common and central components that guide ethical consideration and decisions about captive animals. In this symposium we will focus on a question and topic that spans settings in which nonhuman primates live: the use of post-mortem tissues for scientific research. The speakers will provide an overview of the types of scientific questions that have been, and continue to be, addressed through use of tissue banking and distribution programs. The overview will highlight the breadth of research areas and topics in which scientific discoveries have depended upon archival tissue, terminal studies, and integration of pre- and post-mortem measurements. The speakers will then place the scientific research and post-mortem studies into the broader framework of ethical consideration and decision-making. We will discuss why the scientific community should actively participate and inform public dialogue and policy considerations that affect decisions about where animals live and where their brains and bodies go when they die.