Abstract # 6019 Event # 2:

Scheduled for Saturday, September 13, 2014 10:00 AM-11:45 AM: Session 2 (Decatur A) Symposium


INTEGRATING PRIMATE AND ECOSYSTEM HEALTH: THE ONE HEALTH PERSPECTIVE

T. R. Gillespie
Emory University & Rollins School of Public Health, Departments of Environmental Sciences & Environmental Health, 400 Dowman Drive, Suite E510, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
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     Pathogen emergence is disproportionately associated with the tropics and is often linked to anthropogenic change. Unique human and primate behaviors associated with this interface can also contribute to chronic zoonotic transmission and / or disease emergence. To better understand these transmission dynamics, we have used a mixed-methods approach in systems in tropical Africa and Latin America integrating epidemiology, molecular ecology, behavioral ecology, vector ecology, social and clinical survey, and spatially-explicit modeling. Using examples from our research, I will demonstrate how key human behaviors, primate behaviors, ecological conditions, and landscape features in such systems increase the risk of interspecific disease transmission among people, primates, and domesticated animals. Supported by: NIH, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, The Morris Animal Foundation, PIVOT, The Herrnstein Foundation, The Emory University Global Health Institute, National Geographic Society.