Abstract # 20:

Scheduled for Thursday, August 18, 2005 09:30 AM-12:00 PM: Session 3 (Crystal Ballroom) Symposium


COMPARATIVE PRIMATE GERONTOLOGY: DATA MINING, TISSUE SHARING, AND CLINICAL CARE

J. Erwin1 and J. L. Robertson2
1Foundation for Comparative and Conservation Biology, Needmore, PA 17238, USA, 2Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology and Center for Comparative Oncology, VA-MD Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA.
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     Among the most important ethical obligations we have to our nonhuman primate cousins is that of learning from them in ways that can promote their well-being. Behavioral observation, health monitoring, physiological characterization, genomic analyses, imaging, and post-mortem pathology assessment provide information that amplifies understanding, appreciation, and considerate care for each individual. When each primate contributes information to databases, individual profiles and population patterns are established that help to elucidate gene and health outcome relationships, assist in refining diagnoses and informing treatment options, promote identification of natural models of diseases and disorders, and allow comparisons across species and institutions. Examples are given from laboratories, breeding colonies, and zoological gardens, and increased cooperation and collaboration is proposed to further coordinate assembly and access to databases and archived primate tissues and images.