Abstract # 4661 Event # 206:

Scheduled for Saturday, June 22, 2013 10:00 AM-12:00 PM: Session 25 (San Geronimo Ballroom C) Symposium


CIRCADIAN RHYTHMS IN NON-HUMAN PRIMATES AND THEIR MODULATION OF PHYSIOLOGICAL FUNCTIONS

I. Zhdanova1,2
1Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA, 2Caribbean Primate Research Center, Sabana Seca, Puerto Rico
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The circadian clock is a basic biological function that provides adaptive synchrony of the organism with periodically changing environment and is essential for the mutual synergy of internal molecular and physiological processes. There is increasing evidence that alterations in the circadian mechanisms can significantly increase the risk of major human disorders, from cancer to immunological, metabolic, cardiovascular, neurological and mental conditions. The molecular mechanisms of the clock, based on specific transcriptional negative feedback loops, are highly conserved and are successfully studied in diverse organism, from drosophila to mouse. However, the non-human primate models provide unique insights into human-like central circadian oscillators and contribution of peripheral oscillators to temporal organization of the majority of physiological functions. Thus, the translational significance of these studies, especially in diurnal NHPs, is difficult to overestimate. Importantly, it is of major importance to consider circadian variation in physiological and behavioral functions, and their individual patterns, while designing and conducting diverse studies in NHP models. This symposium will provide an overview of the role of the circadian rhythm system and consequences of its disruption in humans and other animals including altered immune functions, hormonal patterns, and food intake.