Abstract # 80:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 20, 2009 09:15 AM-12:00 PM: Session 7 (Mission Bay Ballroom AB) Symposium


PRIMATE POPULATIONS: THE ENDS OF THE SPECTRUM. A TRIBUTE TO CHARLES SOUTHWICK: CELEBRATING 50+ YEARS OF PRIMATE FIELD WORK

R. C. Kyes
Dept. of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
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For more than 50 years, Charles Southwick has studied nonhuman primates around the world, from his first contact with primates in 1951 as a graduate student studying howler monkeys on Barro Colorado, Panama, to India, where he established a lifelong collaborative program studying rhesus macaques. His passion and dedication to Primatology has influenced a generation of field researchers worldwide. This symposium honors Chuck Southwick and pays tribute to his lifetime of adventure and achievement. The theme, primates at the ends of the spectrum, focuses on species/populations that are overabundant and those that are endangered. Presentations will highlight species with which and/or geographic regions where Chuck has worked over the decades - including howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra) in Mexico, long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) in Singapore, Douc langurs (Pygathrix nemaeus)in Vietnam, rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in Nepal and India, golden langurs (Trachypithecus geei) in India, and Sulawesi black macaques (Macaca nigra) in Indonesia. Chuck’s scientific contributions to Primatology will never be forgotten nor will his excitement and respect for those he has spent a lifetime studying.