Abstract # 80:

Scheduled for Sunday, September 14, 2014 08:45 AM-09:45 AM: Session 12 (Decatur A) Featured Speaker


DECIPHERING THE SOURCES OF DIFFERENTIAL REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS: CONFLICT AND COOPERATION IN COSTA RICAN CAPUCHINS

L. Fedigan
University of Calgary, Department of Anthropology, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, Canada
line
     Why do some individuals, groups and populations reproduce better than others over time? How do male and female primates co-exist, compete and collaborate in order to live and reproduce successfully in year-round social communities? These are the central questions that drive my research. My team has tracked the behavioral ecology and life histories of Costa Rican white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus) for 31 years and examined many possible predictors of reproductive success. Dominance rank explains much of the reproductive skew exhibited by male capuchins, but not that seen in females. Therefore, we have examined other factors that can influence differential reproductive success in females, such as maternal age, longevity, sensory acuity, timing of reproductive events, sex ratio of groups, and availability of kin. Sexual conflict is prominent in capuchin society and male takeovers followed by infanticide appear to confound the effects of female dominance hierarchies on reproductive success. I will provide examples of the strategies and counter-strategies of male and female capuchins as they compete for control over reproduction. At the same time, capuchins can be described as communal breeders in which multiple breeding females and resident males cooperate in the care of infants born in the group - exhibiting extensive carrying, protecting, allonursing and tolerance of food taking by immatures, all of which enhance the reproductive success of individual group members.